Morton’s Neuroma Diagnosis

A pain in the foot does not necessarily mean that you have Morton’s Neuroma. It could be other similar conditions like capsulitis, intermetatarsal bursitis or Freiberg’s disease which would also  give you similar symptoms like the ones you find in Morton’s Nueroma. The real reason for the foot pain can not be known without having it properly diagnosed.
There are a few steps a podiatrist normally follows to make sure that the pain you feel in your foot is from  the Morton’s Neuroma condition. This usually includes Rubbing the area to bring forth any kind of pain or sensation. The doctor may even squeeze the toes from side to side or try to feel the neuroma by pressing a thumb between the third and fourth toe spaces called the third interspace.
A sure sign that someone  has a Morton’s Neuroma is the Mulder’s sign. For this sign the doctor will palpate the affected interspace with one hand and with their second hand they will squeeze the entire foot. Doing so, the doctor can easily hear a audible click sound – known as the Mulder’s Sign. This will help to ensure that your pain is clearly from the Morton’s Neuroma condition.
foot x ray
side foot x ray
To make sure that your pain is not from any kind of arthritis or rheumatism, the doctor might further advise you to take an x-ray. This will also help to check out whether you have any kind of fractures as well as tell the doctor what the density of your joints and bones is. to get Further confirmation that there is no tumor in the foot causing such condition of compression, an MRI scan may be prescribed. This test will also help in determining the size of the neuroma and the line of treatment to be followed to treat it.
An MRI scan is usually prescribed in the event you need a surgery to do away with Morton’s Neuroma. Such a test will help to determine how much of the nerve needs to be done away with. Also it will be a great guideline in determining the exact size and position of the neuroma and what kind of surgical technique needs to be used.
You need to strictly adhere by what your doctor says to make sure you can take good care of your foot while there is still time time. The more you avoid the situations that aggravate the neuroma, the better things get. Also a proper foot insert or shoe that provides you plenty of toe space and low heels is essential to avoid recurrence of the Morton’s Neuroma condition in the future.

A pain in the foot does not necessarily mean that you have Morton’s Neuroma. It could be other similar conditions like capsulitis, intermetatarsal bursitis or Freiberg’s disease which would also  give you similar symptoms like the ones you find in Morton’s Nueroma. The real reason for the foot pain can not be known without having it properly diagnosed.

There are a few steps a podiatrist normally follows to make sure that the pain you feel in your foot is from  the Morton’s Neuroma condition. This usually includes Rubbing the area to bring forth any kind of pain or sensation. The doctor may even squeeze the toes from side to side or try to feel the neuroma by pressing a thumb between the third and fourth toe spaces called the third interspace.

A sure sign that someone  has a Morton’s Neuroma is the Mulder’s sign. Read the rest of this entry »

Morton’s Neuroma Surgery

It is still a dilemma for most doctors as to what exactly Morton’s Neuroma is caused by. This pain in the forefoot could be a result of some irritation, injury or pressure. The most common reasons of this foot condition is wearing shoes that do not fit and/or high heel shoes, being involved in high-impact athletic activities, or injuring your foot. In some other cases, it could be a result of flatfeet, excessive flexibility, hammertoes, or bunions. Whatever the reason, it is best to treat it at the earliest sign of symptoms.
Need for Surgery:
Morton’s Neuroma is a common disease of the foot. It is observed in females more often than males most likely because of the heels women wear. Though there are conservative lines of treatment available, Morton’s Neuroma can in some cases only be solved by surgery.  Conservative treatment may fail to give relief to some patients with increased difficulties in movement. In such cases where surgery is warranted there are two types of surgery the patient could be asked to undergo.
Types of Surgery:
The first type of surgery is known as the ‘Dorsal Approach’. Under these conditions, an incision is made on the top of the foot and the procedure is carried on there from. The good part of this surgery is that the patient does not need to use any support to walk afterward. They can easily walk around the same day for the most part. Also this procedure will leave the healthier tissue for secondary surgery, in case it may be required. However, it has been seen that this kind of surgery may lead to instability in the forefoot that may require attention in for the future.
The second type of surgery is known as the ‘Plantar Approach’. The doctor makes an incision on the sole of the foot to repair the damage. The surgery cripples the patient for some weeks and they may need to use crutches to move around. Also the patient can feel uncomfortable from the scars that are formed on the sole of the foot. However, some doctors prefer this method of surgery. The reason for this is that it allows them better access to the neuroma and helps them to make resects without cutting any structures in the process.
Effects of Surgery:
The surgery is not without complications. The area of the foot that undergoes surgery contains a large number of nerves, small blood vessels and muscles as well. This is why there is a huge chance for complications to occur from surgery. Secondly, there is a chance for recurrence that might require further treatment or surgery. Finally, the area that remains after the neuroma is removed gets filled in with blood immediately after. This can cause a painful hematoma condition. There is a big risk of infection in such situations.
Conclusion:
A foot and ankle doctor will be the best judge for the line of treatment to be followed. The length of recovery time required by a patient may vary greatly depending upon the type of surgery undertaken and the procedures performed.

It is still a dilemma for most doctors as to what exactly Morton’s Neuroma is caused by. This pain in the forefoot could be a result of some irritation, injury or pressure. The most common reasons of this foot condition is wearing shoes that do not fit and/or high heel shoes, being involved in high-impact athletic activities, or injuring your foot. In some other cases, it could be a result of flatfeet, excessive flexibility, hammertoes, or bunions. Whatever the reason, it is best to treat it at the earliest sign of symptoms. Read the rest of this entry »

Morton’s Neuroma Home Remedies

Here are a few things you can do on your own to help prevent and relieve the pain of Morton’s Neuroma

  • Get New Shoes . Stop using shoes with have raised heels. Also shoes must have ample room in the toes and not be confining at all. we recommend flats to reduce pain and pressure or wide widths would be perfect
  • Anti-Inflammatory Over the counter medications like advil or motron or Herbal Anti inflation pills can help relieve pain and pressure. Make sure you are healthy enough to take these medications as they carry their own risks also. Read the rest of this entry »

What is Morton’s Neuroma?

Morton’s Neuroma is a condition where there is an enlarged nerve occurring between the third and fourth toes. This junction where two nerves meet each other could be quite a problem for some people because it is bigger in size than the meeting points of other nerves. The Morton’s Neuroma is also caused because the spot lies inside the subcutaneous tissue, quite close to an artery and vein and also above the fat pad of the foot. Read the rest of this entry »

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